We are delighted to announce that we are now a member of the Global Investigative Journalism Network. The GIJN is a worldwide network of non-profit organizations that endeavor to advance new forms of investigate journalism. The group connects us with colleagues in Europe, Africa, Asia and North and South America.

The network fosters a lively exchange. It enables the formation of groups to research individual issues or to establish long-term cooperation. The idea is simple: if the bad guys operate at a global level, we have to conduct cross-border investigations. There's no room for egotism; we have to work together and help each other. Both data journalism and computer assisted reporting received decisive impulses through the GIJN.

The GIJN is not just hot air. Through the network, we have set up long-term cooperation with IRPI and our colleagues Giulio Rubino and Cecilia Anesi. We work with Nils Mulvad from Denmark and with many other colleagues in the whole world. Every two years everyone comes together at the GIJC – the Global Investigative Journalism Conference. In 2013 we met in Rio de Janeiro. It's the best conference of its kind. There are workshops which reveal the complexities of international weapons trading. Amazing. Next year we meet in Norway.

David Kaplan is the Executive Director of the GIJN. He is based in Washington. David looks back on a long career in investigative journalism. He was chief investigative correspondent for the weekly U.S. News & World Report and editorial director of the Center for Public Integrity. He also worked as Director of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.

Gabriela Manuli supports David as Deputy Director. Originally from Argentina, Gabriela is now based in Europe. She previously worked as a reporter for the Spanish version of the International Center for Journalists.

The GIJN is run by a board of directors which consists of 15 people from member organizations on all continents.

We are delighted to be part of this network.

Independent Journalism